Simple Cream Cake

The Settlement Cookbook Cream Cake | In Jennie's Kitchen

Last night, while flipping through photos on my phone, I was reminded of this perfectly wonderful, and incredibly easy Simple Cream Cake I baked a few weeks ago. I’ve been scaling down a lot of my recipes to fit the smaller needs of our family, so when I came across a rather adorable looking, mini 3-cup bundt pan while shopping at a kitchen supply shop up in Rhinebeck, I just had to buy it.

Jump straight to the recipe for Simple Cream Cake

The pan is made by NordicWare, so I felt mostly confident in my purchase, but the lightweight design of it left me wondering if a pan so stinking cute could also be reliable. The idea of baking in bundt pans either gets you excited for the beautiful design, or leaves you anxious, praying you’ve greased and floured it enough for the cake to slide out with ease. There was only way to find out, and my inner, impatient child had to know immediately.

The day faded away quickly, and come 5:00pm, I still hadn’t had a chance to bake anything. Not one to let a clock thwart my baking habits, I decided it needed to be something quick & simple that could bake while I cooked dinner. I knew exactly where to go, and perused my vintage cookbook collection. Unlike so many of the modern day tomes, I find older cookbooks from the 40s and 50s to be economical and practical when it comes to time and ingredients. Funny when you think about it since cooks, okay let’s face it—women, most likely had a lot more time to spend in the kitchen than we do today (present company excluded since it’s what I do professionally).

The Settlement Cookbook Cream Cake | In Jennie's Kitchen

The winning recipe was simply titled cream cake from The Settlement Cookbook (1944). It’s a brilliant recipe, the cream serving purpose as both the liquid and fat component in this cake (as opposed to using both milk and butter). All you need are six ingredients, which if you’re an avid baker and cook, you likely already have in your cupboards: sugar, flour, baking powder, eggs, heavy cream, and vanilla extract. The recipe actually calls for “flavoring” so you can use any extract you like in place of the vanilla.

The Settlement Cookbook Cream Cake | In Jennie's Kitchen

Another reason to love this recipe? It’s mixed up in one bowl with just a whisk—no machinery needed. It annoys me to no end that every baking recipe nowadays is written with stand mixer instructions, especially recipes that can easily be done with a whisk and some elbow grease.

It almost took longer to grease and flour the pan than it did to mix up the cake batter. The directions called for using a small cake pan, so I had a hunch my teeny 3-cup bundt would be perfect, and it was indeed. I held my breath until the last second, just as I readied myself to flip the pan upside down and invert the cake. All worry was for naught as it plopped out of the pan with no resistance at all. Of course, wait until the cake is completely cooled to do this. Thankfully, my back porch isn’t insulated, and aided greatly in quick-cooling the cake so we could enjoy it in time for dinner.

The Settlement Cookbook Cream Cake | In Jennie's Kitchen

The cake is a cross between a pound cake and layer cake consistency. Sturdy but light, if that makes sense. The crumb is incredibly tender, too. You can certainly serve it plain, or with a dusting of confectioners’ sugar, but I wanted to satisfy a chocolate craving, too. A thick glaze of dark chocolate ganache was the perfect way to do so. I sprinkled on some chopped homemade candied orange for an extra wow factor, which both my girls promptly picked off their slices. I bet a lemon glaze would be lovely, too.

The Settlement Cookbook Cream Cake | In Jennie's Kitchen

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Simple Cream Cake

4.5 from 2 reviews
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: Serves 6

Ingredients

  • ¾ cup (150 grams) granulated natural cane sugar
  • 1 ½ cups (180 grams) flour
  • 2 teaspoons (10 grams) baking powder
  • 2 eggs, at room temperature
  • ⅔ cup (160 ml) heavy cream
  • 1 teaspoon (5 ml) vanilla extract

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350ºF (180ºC). Generously grease and flour a 6-inch (3-cup) bundt tin.
  2. Add the sugar, flour, and baking powder to a deep bowl. Whisk to blend.
  3. Add the eggs, cream, and vanilla. Whisk until well blended.
  4. Scrape the batter into the prepared tin. Gently tap the pan on the counter to smooth out the batter. Bake until deep golden and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean, about 45 minutes.
  5. Click here for more cake recipes

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12 Comments

  • Carolyn

    Lovely! I can’t wait to make this! Did you by chance happen to not how much batter the recipe made? I don’t have a mini-bundt pan in my future so I’m trying to determine if this would work in an 8×8 pan. Maybe a loaf pan would be better.

  • Janey Phillips

    As it is just my husband and I now, I am in the market for recipes and cookware that make smaller amounts of dessert items. I just bought a couple 6″ cake pans and now I will get a small bundt pan. However, I could not bring myself to buy the one you mentioned, as multiple reviews indicated that it was difficult to get cakes etc out of it in spite of well-greased efforts. I went instead with a nonstick 7″ bundt that cost 50% more. This post also made me want to look for vintage cookbooks….Thanks.

  • Jennie

    I’m guessing since I baked it in a 3-cup bundt pan, then it makes 3 cups of batter? -Jennie

  • brennie

    Hi Jennie, love these smaller volume recipes you’re doing.
    Will try this one later, but am going to be cheeky and add some leftover quinoa to the mix. That will be a first, but why should the chooks have all the fun with the unused extras!
    Cheers,
    Brennie

  • Jennie

    There’s a wonderful recipe on the blog for veggie patties using leftover quinoa & broccoli stalks! xo-Jennie

  • Sally

    I’m with you on the frustration that so many baking recipes start with “in the bowl of a stand mixer fit with the paddle attachment…” I’m also with you on the love of vintage cookbooks and/or recipes.

    You said that the original recipe called for a small baking pan, I thought it was probably baked in an 8″ round baking pan. I used that and since that pan is shallower than your bundt pan, I decreased the baking time to 35 minutes. Perfect!

    As a single empty-nester I appreciate the scaled down recipes, but wish they didn’t call for specialized pans.

  • Jennie

    Thanks for letting us know you tried it in a smaller pan, Sally, with great success, too. This is one of those instances where the older books are evidence of the comfort level of cooks overall at the time they were written. Calling for a small baking pan assumes the baker has the instinct to know what that means, and you did! -Jennie

  • Leann

    I read this recipe on Friday and found it intriguing. I loved that it was a simple recipe from 1944. I happened to have everything on hand to make it so I did just that.

    I loved the size of the cake and it had big flavor. However, I was a little surprised by the texture. I do love a good pound cake and I guess that is more what I was anticipating. My husband’s first response was “I expected a lighter cake texture but it seems more like cornbread but not as grainy.” Once he said that, I couldn’t get that out of my head! But overall, it was delicious and I would definitely make it again.

  • Jennie

    As I mentioned it’s a cross between a layer cake & pound cake texture, so I think your husband’s description is pretty accurate. 😉 -Jennie

  • Mary

    Just made this cake. It was easy to put together, like you said it would be and yes tasted delicious! Thanks for a great recipe.

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